RIC VII Lugdunum 63

Title

RIC VII Lugdunum 63

Date

319-320 CE

Description

Bust of Constantine I, helmeted, cuirassed, right; Two Victories, winged, draped, facing each other, holding a shield inscribed VOT/PR supported by an altar

Subject

Coin

Publisher

Bethel University Digital Library

Contributor

Haley Johnson

Coverage

POINT(536498.0519120165 5741927.7541518975)

Type

Coin

Format

image/jpeg

Language

Roman

Identifier

RomancoinJohnson0101.jpg; RomancoinJohnson0102.jpg

Mint

Lugdunum (Lyons)

Denomination

AE3
AE2

Authority

Constantine I (306- 337 A.D.)

Deity

Victory

Portrait

Constantine I

Region

Gallia

Material

Bronze. This coin was struck with a silvered surface, to make it appear to have a higher intrinsic value, and some of the silvering remains on the coin.

Obverse Legend

CONSTANTINVS P AVG

Obverse Type

Bust of Constantine I, helmeted, cuirassed, right

Reverse Legend

VICTORIAE LAET PRINC PERP

Reverse Type

Two Victories, winged, draped, facing each other, holding a shield inscribed VOT/PR supported by an altar

Obverse Analysis

The obverse has a bust of Constantine I with the AVG that established him as the emperor of all of Rome. The letter “P” was commonly used on coins for emperors in the 4th century CE and was likely used to show the piety and the happiness that Constantine was able to bring to his people as an emperor. Constantine is depicted with a helmet and is cuirassed. The helmet was an important way to historically indicate and share to the public that Constantine was successful in winning the battle at the Milvian bridge. Yet, with the helmet, Constantine is depicted as being draped with a garment that was commonly used to indicate power. The letters “AVG” continue this power, as it stood for the emperor at the time. This coin basically pushed the idea of his legitimacy, that he fairly won the seat as emperor.

Reverse Analysis

On the reverse, the Latin translation reads “Joyous victory to the eternal Prince.” On this coin, as well as with the coins that have Licinius I on it, is where the first supposed symbols of Christ are mentioned. The image depicts two “victories” on the left and right of a shield being placed onto an altar. The shield has the letters “VOT/PR” which means Vota Populi Romani, meaning “vows of the people of Rome/Roman People.” This is a vow or a promise made to a deity often, and in this case, it is wise to assume it is to the Christian God. It is also commonly used as a way to depict the promises that were kept, possibly saying that God had kept his promise in allowing Constantine to win the battle against Maxentius at the Milvian bridge.

Mintmark

-/-//(captive left)(captive right)

Files

RomancoinJohnson0101.jpg
RomancoinJohnson0102.jpg

Citation

“RIC VII Lugdunum 63,” Render Unto Caesar, accessed October 19, 2019, http://renderuntocaesar.betheldigitalscholarship.org/items/show/37.

Output Formats